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Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
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yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info
yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete
Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved
Zoom Info

yuriorbital:

Scars of concrete

Kętrzyn, Poland 09-2013

In the center of a wet and dark forest close to Kętrzyn, Poland, history left some indelible marks. Here was built Wolfsschanze, Adolf Hitler’s first Eastern Front military headquarters in World War II. The complex of bunker, which would become one of several Führerhauptquartiere (Führer Headquarters) located in various parts of occupied Europe, was built for the start of Operation Barbarossa - the invasion of the Soviet Union - in 1941.

In October 1944 the Red Army reached the borders of East Prussia during the Baltic Offensive. Hitler departed from the Wolf’s Lair for the final time on 20 November when the Soviet advance reached Angerburg (now Węgorzewo). Two days later the order was given to destroy the complex. However the actual demolition did not take place until the night of 24–25 January 1945.

Despite the use of tons of explosives - one bunker required an estimated 8,000 kg of TNT - most of the complex buildings were only partially destroyed due their immense size and reinforced structures, and almost 70 years later, the ruins of the bunkers are still in the forest, gloomy and threatening, covered by a green moss, breaking the quiet of the nature with their sharp edges.


Copyright © Yuri Segalerba, All Rights Reserved

fashionsfromhistory:

Day Dress

c.1882-1885

North America

This day outfit, from the late bustle era, was worn by Kate Morris Cone, a student in the first graduating class of Smith College in 1879. The fawn wool bodice is cut in a “tailor-made” style, tightly fitted with an obvious CF button closure, long cuffed sleeves and an elaborate tail, all to suggest a man’s tail coat. These details are in contrast with the lace trim at the collar and cuffs, the three large purple bows on the wool swags and the three rows of narrow box pleats all around the skirt hem. The foundation skirt is made in a watered silk taffeta. It would be worn over a separate cage bustle. This combination of different colors and fabrics is popular at this time. (X)

Smith College Historic Costume Collection

coelasquid:

sonneillonv:

underhuntressmoon:

voidbat:

explainervideo:

What happens to cats in zero gravity ?   more educational gifs«

OH GOD THOSE POOR BABIES i am sobbing i am laughing so hard

In the last pic the cat is all “oh thank god I found ground NO WAIT COME BACK GROUND”

THOSE POOR BABIES OMG WHY AM I LAUGHING AT THIS

Pigeons are even funnier in zero g, they don’t know which way is up and fly upside down 

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